Current Research

We have developed a comprehensive reading list of original scientific research papers from the past decade relating to psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy in the treatment of end-of-life distress.  

This bibliography is appended to our application to Health Canada and forms the basis of our scientific argument that psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy is a clinically appropriate treatment for the patients we describe.

Of particular significance are the four articles highlighted in green.  The first two (found in Section A) report the latest and most robust clinical trials; the second two (found in Section B) are comprehensive reviews of the research history and summaries of results.   We encourage you to begin with these.  You can access the full text of these articles by clicking on them.

The items in this bibliography collectively document that more than 2000 doses of psilocybin have been safely administered since the early ‘90s.  

They affirm a consistency and coherence of results across research papers, and the high degree of agreement among research teams, across institutions, and across continents.  They also show a notable lack of peer-reviewed criticism of the basic findings. 

Collectively, they indicate that psilocybin-assisted psychotherapy is an effective and low-risk treatment for end-of-life distress of cancer patients when conducted according to research-established protocols by suitably trained therapists.  

 

“Psilocybin produced large and significant decreases in clinician-rated and self-rated measures of depression, anxiety or mood disturbance, and increases in measures of quality of life, life meaning, death acceptance, and optimism. These effects were sustained at 6 months.”

Griffiths et al. 2016

“Psilocybin produced immediate, substantial, and sustained improvements in anxiety and depression and led to decreases in cancer-related demoralization and hopelessness, improved spiritual wellbeing, and increased quality of life.”

Ross et al. 2016

No serious adverse events attributed to psilocybin administration occurred.”

Griffiths et al. 2016

“Psilocybin… has a well-established physiological and psychological safety profile in human laboratory and clinical trial research…There were no serious adverse effects, either medical or psychiatric, in the trial that were attributed to…psilocybin.”

Ross et al. 2016